Public Scholarship

The Hill

Encouraging Bravery & Fortitude in Dismantling the Insidious Stronghold of Racism was published in The Hill

“The process of institutional courage needs to be intentional, deliberate, and iterative. We must acknowledge, address, and correct this oppression. We must systematically and critically take an inventory of discriminatory practices in policing, voting, education, housing, health care, and employment. And then we must act to change these practices individually, systemically, and culturally…And of course, while radical healing in communities of color can and should happen amidst oppression, we can’t underestimate the value of actual change and actual equality in promoting healing for individuals, communities, and society. Thus, such institutional courage can mean that this societal moment, instead of being fleeting, is a turning point that leads us to the right side of justice and healing.”–Dr. Joan Cook & Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

July 2020

Blavity

Russell Simmons, Rape, & The Myth of ‘Toxic Femininity’: What Black Men Can Do To Be Part of the Solution was published in Blavity

“This notion of Toxic Femininity makes Black women and girls responsible for Black men’s sexually abusive behavior. The truth, however, is more straightforward: Black men are responsible for their own behavior, with rape not being an inevitable by-product of Blackness or maleness. At the same time, Black women and girls are never responsible for Black men’s behavior — no matter what they say or don’t say, do or don’t do, wear or don’t wear. Black women and girls have been and continue to be sexually abused at alarmingly high rates because of people and cultural norms that perpetrate and condone such abuse — not because of anything they’re doing wrong….Many Black men do not sexually abuse anyone in any way and do not condone such behavior. What about all those Black men? What can they do?…Know that your capability of not sexually abusing anyone is the same capability that all Black men have — including those who rape. Do not provide excuses for Black men who rape.”–Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez & Dr. Robyn L. Gobin

June 2020

The Conversation

Weinstein trial begs a question: Why is the pain of women and minorities often ignored? was published in The Conversation, which is a news outlet for researchers to translate their work for a non-academic audience of over 10 million users

“Cultural betrayal trauma theory explains how marginalized women pay an additional price when they experience violence at the hands of marginalized men. This is within-group violence — for instance, when a black man sexually assaults a black woman or girl. Implicit with that kind of violence is a cultural betrayal. The supposed solidarity between survivor and perpetrator against forces of discrimination is shattered.To keep that perception intact, black women are expected to cover for black men who abuse them. So they suffer in silence – otherwise, the black community, already harmed by racism, is impugned.”–Dr. Anne DePrince & Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

As of 30 January 2021, the article has over 7,300 readers.

February 2020

The Conversation

The Unique Harm of Sexual Abuse in the Black Community was published in The Conversation, which is a news outlet for researchers to translate their work for a non-academic audience of over 10 million users

“The body of research to date suggests that cultural betrayal may be a unique harm within violence in minority populations, including the black community. As such, the alleged sexual traumas perpetrated by R. Kelly and Clarence Thomas have a cultural betrayal that isn’t found in Woody Allen’s alleged abuse. Moreover, black men’s death threats against Tarana Burke are (intra)cultural pressure that is laced with misogynoir, or sexism in the black community.”–Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

The research study featured in this article is Isn’t It All About Victimization? (Intra)cultural Pressure and Cultural Betrayal Trauma in Ethnic Minority College Women (Gómez, 2018). 

Also published on the International Society for Research on Aggression (ISRA) Blog and Blavity, featured on Today@Wayne, and re-published by over 15 other news outlets. 

As of 30 January 2021, the article has over 633,300 readers.

May 2019

Gender Discrimination: Professors Are/Not Professors

In an attempt to uphold gender discrimination, University of Oregon (UO) is insisting that professors do not hold the same job re the Freyd vs. UO lawsuit. 

My response in The Register-Guard Oregon newspaper, with lots of links from the case:

“UO is actively promoting gender discrimination through its legal team’s argument that professors do not hold the same job. If upheld, this ruling has the potential to undermine equality for women and minority faculty at UO and across the nation for decades to come.

Though I can’t prevent UO from its behavior in this case, there are people at UO right now who can. From President Michael Schill to General Counsel Kevin Reed to the board of trustees. It’s not too late. UO could still choose to live up to its mission of equity and inclusion. If for no other reason, UO could remember that its reputation as a top public university is on the line. Gender equality matters at universities like UO.

The world is watching.”–Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

Change.org Petition of Support for Dr. Freyd

7 November 2019

Who’s Betraying Who? R. Kelly, Sexual Violence, & The Dismissal of Black Women & Girls

New piece

“The second truth is where it seems we consistently get into trouble: The rape of Black women and girls does matter. . . As a Black female clinical psychologist, I have coined the term cultural betrayal to describe instances where violence happens within the Black community. . . Nevertheless, in these discussions of sexual violence, often what is termed “betrayal” is something quite different. . . We must ask ourselves why.”–Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

As of 24 May 2019, this article has received over 700 views. 

25 August 2019

Cultural Betrayal Trauma Video

In this short video, Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez discusses Cultural Betrayal Trauma Theory and the article, Isn’t It All About Victimization? (Intra)Cultural Pressure and Cultural Betrayal Trauma in Ethnic Minority College Women, which was published in Violence Against Women.

As of 14 June 2020, this video has been viewed 700 times

January 2019

Open Essay on Gender Discrimination, Freyd’s Lawsuit, & Recommendations for Universities

Open Essay: Gender Discrimination, Dr. Jennifer Freyd’s Lawsuit, & Recommendations for Universities

“There are few emotions as potent as those caused by the pain of watching someone you respect, admire, and care for be discriminated against. Understanding how this discrimination, which feels so isolated and personal, actually is endemic of academia’s dirty little secret of systemic gender discrimination—contributing to the leaky pipeline for women—is more painful still.”–Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

As of 25 August 2019, the open essay has been viewed over 700 times. 

December 2018

Black Women & #MeToo

Op-ed comparing Ford/Kavanaugh with Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas: “Black Women & #MeToo: The Violence of Silencing” translates research on cultural betrayal trauma theory to the general public.

“Following a quarter of a century – from the testimonies of Anita Hill, J.D., to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford – the U.S. is still struggling: with both how not to violate women, as well as how not to silence them. More difficult still is attuning to the crosshairs that Black women additional face related to race, class, gender expression, sexual orientation, religion, disability, nation of origin, and the intersection of these and other identities. Through centralizing various forms of oppression in addressing sexual violence against Black women, I can only hope that in 2045 – 27 years from now, we are not still haunted with these same ghosts of violence, silencing, and denial of Black women’s experiences.”–Dr. Jennifer M. Gómez

December 2018

%d bloggers like this: